HLI Conference 2016 Abstracts

 

 

13th Health Libraries Inc. Conference

State Library of Victoria, Melbourne

Friday 21 October 2016

“The (In)visible library”

*Registrations Now Open*

9:35 - 10:10

Keynote
How librarians raised me: a clinician-educator-researcher perspective.

Dr Christopher Leung, Medical Lead, Clinical Education Unit; Clinical Supervisor and Academic Lead Scholarly Selective Program, School of Medicine University of Melbourne; Gastroenterologist, Department of Gastroenterology, Austin Health; NHMRC Research Scholar.

10:10 - 10:35

Evidence-based practice modules for a core 1st year Bachelor of Nursing Unit

Chrissy Freestone, Liaison Librarian, Deakin University; Blair Kelly, Medical Librarian, Deakin University; Fiona Russell, Manager, Faculty of Health Library Services at Deakin University Library & Chris Rawson, Digital Literacy Learning Designer, Deakin University

11:15 - 11:40

Increasing the visibility of the library service: our organic structure

Dr Wendy Smyth, Nurse Manager Research, Townsville Hospital & Health Service; Bronia Renison, Director Library Services, Townsville Health Library, Townsville Hospital & Health Service & Louisa D’Arrietta, Client Services Librarian, Townsville Health Library, Townsville Hospital & Health Service

11:40 - 12:05

Clinical knowledge centre: Libguides beyond the Library

Jane Edwards, Library Manager, RDNS/RSL Care & Kylie Elder, Senior Clinical Nurse Advisor: Chronic and Complex Disease, RDNS/RSL Care

12:05 - 12:30

Building value & visibility in a health promotion NGO

Jenny Ward, Clearinghouse Information Officer, Women's Health Victoria

12:20 - 2:45

Beyond the shelf: opportunities for connections outside the library walls

Teresa Beck-Swindale, Senior Librarian, North West Regional Hospital, Tasmania

2:45 - 3:15

ebooks @ La Trobe – are they future ready?

Arlene O'Sullivan, Senior Coordinator Resources & Metadata Management, La Trobe University & Charlotte Clements, Collections and Access Manager, La Trobe University

3:50 - 4:50 10 minute lightning talks
  • VHLC: An update - Adam Clark, Alfred Health
  • Health Libraries Managers Forum July 2016 - Jeremy Taylor, St Vincent's Health Melbourne
  • Transitioning from health to academic librarianship - Steven Chang, La Trobe University
  • NSQHS standards project - AAnn Ritchie, Barwon Health & Michele Gaca, Austin Health
  • Treasure Hunters - how the Library revealed the lost treasures of Epworth(and revealed our value at the same time) - Susie Moreton, Epworth HealthCare Library

 

 

How librarians raised me: a clinician-educator-researcher perspective.

Dr Christopher Leung, Medical Lead, Clinical Education Unit; Clinical Supervisor and Academic Lead Scholarly Selective Program, School of Medicine University of Melbourne; Gastroenterologist, Department of Gastroenterology, Austin Health; NHMRC Research Scholar.

Our Keynote Speaker this year is Dr Christopher Leung, Medical Lead, Clinical Education Unit, Clinical Supervisor and Academic Lead Scholarly Selective Program School of Medicine University of Melbourne, Gastroenterologist, Department of Gastroenterology Austin Health. Chris works with and uses the Austin Health Sciences Library across all his roles and will provide his perspective as a clinician, educator, researcher and author on how a library is quintessential in supporting these activities.

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Evidence-based practice modules for a core 1st year Bachelor of Nursing Unit

Chrissy Freestone, Liaison Librarian, Deakin University; Blair Kelly, Medical Librarian, Deakin University; Fiona Russell, Manager, Faculty of Health Library Services at Deakin University Library & Chris Rawson, Digital Literacy Learning Designer, Deakin University

Education in the digital age needs to be responsive to the evolving learning requirements of students. To acknowledge and meet the needs of contemporary students, a series of interactive, online learning modules was commissioned for a first year nursing unit at Deakin University Library, Understanding Research Evidence.

The modules were designed to assist students to develop and consolidate their understandings of evidence-based practice. Six modules were produced, moving from introductory content through to translating research evidence into the clinical environment.

The learning objectives of each module are linked to the unit curriculum. Each module was constructively aligned to unit content, as well as the Deakin Graduate Learning Outcome of Digital Literacy. Early modules make provision for students with varying degrees of existing skills and knowledge to ensure foundational capabilities. Later modules then enable the development of further proficiency in the skills required for evidence-based practice. The modules may be undertaken at the student’s pace and discretion. Modules were developed in close consultation between academic and library staff, including nursing liaison librarians and learning and teaching librarians.

The development of the modules represent a shift from one way communication to a participatory self-paced experience which incorporates feedback The Library has developed integrated content that allows for interactivity, but which may also be customised for other purposes or units across all health disciplines. Modules were constructed using SmartSparrow software, an adaptive learning platform.

Data collected from modules allow us to identify which areas of content students require additional support in with a high degree of granularity. This data will be used in future to ensure the continuous improvement of the modules.

As a result of this experience, Library staff have also reported on their improved capacity and confidence in creating, accessible, relevant and interactive learning experiences that integrate core information and digital literacy competencies for excellent learning outcomes. Staff also reported improvements in their ability to use technologies to create premium digital engagement in online learning objects.

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Increasing the visibility of the library service: our organic structure 

Dr Wendy Smyth, Nurse Manager Research, Townsville Hospital & Health Service; Bronia Renison, Director Library Services, Townsville Health Library, Townsville Hospital & Health Service & Louisa D'Arrietta, Client Services Librarian, Townsville Health Library, Townsville Hospital & Health Service

How do you grow a library presence in a large regional health service the size of England and Northern Ireland combined? Five years ago, the library director was a collaborating investigator on a nursing research study to support nurses and midwives with research in rural and remote settings. The intervention included delivering locally relevant education and resources, usually only available in the tertiary hospital where the library is physically located.The relationships generated over the six months’ intervention period were sustained through informal videoconference, email and telephone contacts. We demonstrated increased utilisation of library resources for clinical information from participating sites. However, the variation in uptake of support between the sites highlighted the need for locally targeted strategies.

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Clinical knowledge centre: Libguides beyond the library

Jane Edwards, Library Manager, RDNS/RSL Care & Kylie Elder, Senior Clinical Nurse Advisor: Chronic and Complex Disease, RDNS/RSL Care

In recent years RDNS has experienced a period of rapid expansion, major restructure and a merger with RSLCare (QLD). With the nursing workforce working remotely the ability to provide clinical support, information and education to staff became problematic. As part of the restructure a new Senior Clinical Nurse Advisor (SCNA) role for each of our five main clinical areas -diabetes, wound care, dementia/aged care, palliative care and continence was introduced. The SCNA team identified the provision of clinical information to nursing staff an organisational priority but with a geographically dispersed workforce compounded by inadequate technology and limited resources did not have the tools to address this issue.

While working with the SCNAs the Librarian suggested investigating the Libguides product as a platform for creating a ‘one stop shop’ for relevant clinical information, designed specifically to meet the clinical care provision needs of staff. From this conversation the Clinical Knowledge Centre (CKC) was conceived and has since become the major internal information resource for the clinicians.

The CKC project was co-ordinated by the Librarian with the SCNAs, as content specialists, being responsible for content development and input for their individual guides. The success of the initiative was due to the collaboration between the SCNA group and the Librarian as well as coordination and partnership with other teams and departments - the result being the creation of an innovative, interactive, content specific resource, accessible to all staff, on all devices.

This paper outlines the planning, development process, achievements and outcomes of the CKC. This presentation will also demonstrate how the Library service can be utilised to move the profile of the “Invisible” librarian beyond the realm of information provision and into the core of the organisation with a direct impact on service quality and workforce capacity.

The paper will be presented in two parts with the author speaking on the development and processes and Kylie Elder, one of the SCNAs, discussing the CKC from the view of a senior clinician.

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Building value & visibility in a health promotion NGO

Jenny Ward, Clearinghouse Information Officer, Women's Health Victoria

Discusses tools that librarians can use to maintain the value and visibility of the librarian and the library service in a small organisation. The examples are drawn from the evolution of the library service at Women’s Health Victoria – a health promotion NFP organisation, based in Melbourne.

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Beyond the shelf: opportunities for connections outside the library wall

Teresa Beck-Swindale, Senior Librarian, North West Regional Hospital, Tasmania

To remain visible and indeed credible in the eyes of the healthcare staff, the library manager needs to seize every opportunity to embed the library service in the workings of the hospital and the wider healthcare region. For the Librarian at Buttfield Library, Burnie, Tasmania, the predicament of being relocated to temporary accommodation for three years whilst building development took place, prompted creative solutions to connect with staff and maintain a strong presence by participating in working groups and committees as a library promotion strategy.

Attending meetings armed with relevant resources to assist decision making reinforces the library's role as information provider. By venturing outside the library walls and becoming involved in the business of healthcare, the health librarian can inspire trust, so essential to working relationships. As a trusted collaborator, the librarian is then relied upon as an authoritative provider of information cementing the circle of knowledge for the benefit of patients and staff.

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ebooks @ La Trobe – are they future ready?

Arlene O'Sullivan, Senior Coordinator Resources & Metadata Management, La Trobe University & Charlotte Clements, Collections and Access Manager, La Trobe University

In our presentation we will share the La Trobe University Libraries perspective on the future readiness of eBooks from both the library and the user perspectives. We ask the question “When is an eBook not an eBook?”

A case study will also be presented giving a 5 year snapshot of eBook use on one of the major platform used ProQuest eBook Central. The case study looks at increasing eBook use, purchase vs patron drive acquisition (PDA), and the future of eBook access. An overview of the recently updated ProQuest eBook Central platform is also presented.

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